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Legendary Native American Figures: Apotamkin

Name: Apotamkin
Tribal affiliation: Maliseet, Passamaquoddy
Alternate spellings: Aputamkon, Appodumken, Appod'mk'n, Apodumken, Abbodumken, Apotampkin, Apotumk'n, Aboo-dom-k'n, Apotamkon, Apoatamkin, Aboumk'n
Pronunciation: ah-boo-dahm-kun
Type: Monster, sea serpent

The monstrous Apotamkin is often misidentified as a "vampire" by non-Native Americans (particularly since its name was glimpsed in one of the recent "Twilight" movies.) But in actual Maliseet and Passamaquoddy legends, this creature has nothing to do with vampires-- the Apotamkin is a giant fanged sea serpent that lurks in the Passamaquoddy Bay and drags people, especially incautious children, into the water and eats them. Apotamkin is said to have long red hair, and in some stories was once a human woman who was transformed into a serpent.

If you would like to read about some Native American monsters that bear more resemblance to European vampires, please visit our Native American vampire figures page. Apotamkin is definitely a sea monster.

Recommended Books of Related Native American Legends

Giants of the Dawnland:
    A good collection of Wabanaki legends told by a Penobscot Indian author.
Algonquian Spirit:
    Excellent anthology of stories, songs, and oral history from the Maliseet and other Algonquian tribes.
When the Chenoo Howls: Native American Tales of Terror:
    Collection of Native American ghost stories and monster tales told by a Native American storyteller.
The Maine Monster Parade:
    Interesting book about sea serpents and other monsters throughout Maine history, including Penobscot and Passamaquoddy water monsters.

Additional Resources

 Maliseet language
 Maliseet words
 Maine language
 Woodland Native
 Algonquian



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