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Camaracoto Indian Language (Kamarakoto)

Camaracoto is a Cariban language of South America, spoken by 800 people in Venezuela and Brazil. Camaracoto is an agglutinative language with complex verb morphology. Word order is OVS. Camaracoto is closely related to the Pemon dialects and is considered another dialect of Pemon by some linguists.

In their own language, the Camaracoto people call themselves Pemon, which just means "people." Variants of the same name are used by several different Carib tribes in this region, so the people also use the name Camaracoto to refer to their group specifically.

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Our Online Camaracoto Materials

Camaracoto Words:
    Our list of vocabulary words in the Camara language, with comparison to words in other Cariban languages.
Camaracoto Pronunciation Guide:
    How to pronounce Camaracoto words.

Camaracoto Language Resources

Pemon/Camaracoto Language:
    Demographic information on Pemon and Camaracoto from the Ethnologue of Languages.
La Lengua Kamarakotó:
    Information on Camaracoto and Pemong including a linguistic map of South America. Page in Spanish.
Kamarakóto Language Tree:
    Theories about Kamarakoto's language relationships compiled by Linguist List.
Pemon Language Structures:
    Linguistic profile and academic bibliography for Arekuna, Taurepan, and Kamarakota.
Pemon Culture:
    Articles on Pemon society, covering the Arekuna, Camaragoto, and Taurepan.

Links, References, and Additional Information

   Idioma Pemón:
   Information in Spanish about Kamarakoto and the other Pemon languages.



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