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Eñepa (Panare) Language

Eñepa is a Cariban language of South America.
Enepa is spoken by a thousand people in Venezuela. It is an agglutinative language with complex verb morphology.

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Eñepa Language Resources

Eñepa Words
     Our list of vocabulary words in the Eñepa language, with comparison to words in other Cariban languages.
Phonological and Syllabic Systems of the Panare Language:
    Linguistics article on Panare (Eñepa).
La Lengua Panare:
    Information on Eñepa including a linguistic map of South America. Page in Spanish.
House of Languages: Panare:
    Information about Eñapa language usage.
Ethnologue: Eñepa:
     Demographic information on the Eñepa language.
Eñepa Language Tree:
    Theories about Enepa's language relationships compiled by Linguist List.
Panare Language Structures:
    Panare linguistic profile and academic bibliography.

Eñepa Culture and History Links

Penare Indians:
    Introduction to the Panare people of Venezuela.
Orinoco Online: E'ñepa:
    Culture and traditions of the Eñepa, with photographs of Eñepa artifacts.

Books For Sale On The Eñepas

The Panare: Tradition and Change on the Amazonian Frontier:
    Anthropology book on Eñepa cultural adaptation in the modern day.
Under the Rainbow - Nature and Supernature Among the Panare Indians:
    Myths and traditions of the Panares.
Native American Books:
    Evolving list of books about Native Americans in general.

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Links, References, and Additional Information

Idioma Panare * Pueblo eñepá:
Information about the Eñepas in Spanish.
Wikipedia: Panare:
Encyclopedia entry on the Panare language.



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