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Native American Tribes of North Carolina

Welcome to our North Carolina State Facts section, part of an educational project designed to provide information about indigenous people in different U.S. states. Follow the links to the right of our tribal map for more information about the language, culture and history of each North Carolina tribe, or scroll below the map for North Carolina Indian activities including a wordsearch, fact sheets, and words from the Native American languages of North Carolina. Feel free to print any of these materials out for classroom use!

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American Indians in North Carolina

The original inhabitants of the area that is now North Carolina included:

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*The Catawba tribe
*The Cherokee tribe
*The Creek tribe
*The Croatan tribe
*The Tuscarora tribe
*The Tutelo and Saponi tribes
*Carolina Siouan bands including the Cheraw, Chicora, and Waccamaw

There is one federally recognized Indian tribe in North Carolina today:

Here are the addresses of North Carolina's Indian reservations:

*The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians:
Qualla Boundary
Cherokee, NC 28719

Other Indian tribes, bands and communities remaining in North Carolina today include:

*Coharie Intra-Tribal Council:
Route 3, Box 340-E
Clinton, NC 28328

*Haliwa-Saponi Tribe:
PO Box 99
Hollister, NC 27844

*Lumbee Tribe:
PO Box 68
Pembroke, NC 28372

*Meherrin Indian Tribe:
PO Box 508
Winton, NC 27986

*Occaneechi Band of the Saponi Nation:
PO Box 356
Mebane, NC 27302

*Waccamaw-Siouan Tribe of North Carolina:
PO Box 221
Bolton, NC 28423

Teaching and learning activities about North Carolina Native Americans:

Feel free to print these out for classroom use!

*North Carolina Tribes Word Search: Printable puzzle hiding the names of North Carolina's Indian tribes.
*North Carolina Language Greetings: Learn to say "hello" in several languages native to North Carolina.
*North Carolina Native Animals: Learn the Native American names of North Carolina animals.
*Write Your Name In Cherokee: Directions for using the Cherokee writing system to spell English names.
*North Carolina Indian Facts for Kids: Answers to frequently asked questions about the tribes of North Carolina.
    We currently have pages for the Cherokee, Catawba, Tuscarora, Croatoan and Creek tribes.

Recommended books about North Carolina Native Americans:

*North Carolina Indians: Introducing North Carolina's Native American history and culture to kids.
*Native Carolinians: The Indians of North Carolina: A more in-depth book about American Indians in North Carolina.
*Keeping the Circle: American Indian Identity in Eastern North Carolina: Book on the culture of contemporary North Carolina Indians.
*Native Americans in the Carolina Borderlands: Interesting ethnography of the Carolina Siouan tribes.
*The Only Land I Know: Oral history from a Lumbee Indian author.
*Time before History: The Archaeology of North Carolina: Book on prehistoric Indian tribes of North Carolina.

Other resources about American Indian history, culture and society in North Carolina state:

*North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs: Online and printable resources from the North Carolina state government,
    including a calendar of Native American events.
*North Carolina American Indians: Essays on Native North Carolina history, culture, and art.
*Storytelling of the North Carolina Native Americans: Legends and stories from the Cherokee, Lumbee, and Occaneechi Saponi tribes.
*Coastal Carolina Indian Center: Organization working to preserve Powhatan, Tuscarora, and Croatoan culture and traditions.
*Early History of North Carolina: Overview of North Carolina Native American history.

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